Timely traffic light reminder for Taunton pedestrians

Somerset County Gazette: Timely traffic light remember for Taunton pedestrians Timely traffic light remember for Taunton pedestrians

PEDESTRIANS are being urged to press the button on traffic lights before trying to cross the road.

The warning comes after a woman aged 82 had to jump back on the pavement after she claims the ‘green man’ only appeared for three seconds on a busy road near Taunton town centre.

Kathleen Stevens said the incident was the second time it had happened to her as she tried to cross from Mary Street into Paul Street.

She said: “I use that crossing almost every day, and a couple of times the lights have gone red for the traffic and green for pedestrians.

“Both times I made three steps, and the lights turned red for pedestrians and green for the traffic, which started to move.

“It frightened me to death – someone with slower reactions might have been mown down.”

A county council spokesman said the lights were computerised and depended on the amount of traffic exiting Paul Street.

He said: “It’s a busy crossing, and we’d always recommend pedestrians press the button and wait for the green man before attempting to cross, otherwise the lights work automatically and judge the traffic flows regardless of anyone waiting to cross.”

Comments (19)

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4:24pm Sun 9 Dec 12

Dr Dave says...

Even the traffic lights themselves are fed up with the ensuing snarl-ups they cause.
Even the traffic lights themselves are fed up with the ensuing snarl-ups they cause. Dr Dave

10:00pm Sun 9 Dec 12

Mark1970 says...

Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about.

It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen.

Wear bright clothing people.
Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about. It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen. Wear bright clothing people. Mark1970

12:34am Mon 10 Dec 12

Thurza says...

If they are anything like the Wellington lights they work on a sequence, doesn't matter how many times you press the button.
If they are anything like the Wellington lights they work on a sequence, doesn't matter how many times you press the button. Thurza

7:03am Mon 10 Dec 12

FreeSpeech? says...

Fed up with the lights turning to fail-safe red late at night and early hours when hardly any traffic, whoever thought of that need to be shown the rough end of a pineapple.
Fed up with the lights turning to fail-safe red late at night and early hours when hardly any traffic, whoever thought of that need to be shown the rough end of a pineapple. FreeSpeech?

10:14am Mon 10 Dec 12

BaldyLocks says...

Mark1970 wrote:
Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about.

It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen.

Wear bright clothing people.
What a brilliant idea. You are truly a genius of the highest caliber.
Perhaps someone should lobby government to introduce laws to stop people wearing dark clothing. That way anyone deemed by you to be wearing clothing not visible enough can be banged up in gaol where they belong.
Of course the Police would have to have a change of uniform - it just wouldn't be right if they had to arrest themselves now would it. Now I've started to think about it more carefully I'm not sure how practical it would be. I mean, if I was wearing dark clothes during the day and couldn't make it home before dark, what would I do? I'd need to carry a spare set of night clothes with me at all times and find somewhere to change. Or perhaps carry a high-vis jacket with me. Or maybe just not cross the road. Oh goodness now I'm confused.
[quote][p][bold]Mark1970[/bold] wrote: Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about. It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen. Wear bright clothing people.[/p][/quote]What a brilliant idea. You are truly a genius of the highest caliber. Perhaps someone should lobby government to introduce laws to stop people wearing dark clothing. That way anyone deemed by you to be wearing clothing not visible enough can be banged up in gaol where they belong. Of course the Police would have to have a change of uniform - it just wouldn't be right if they had to arrest themselves now would it. Now I've started to think about it more carefully I'm not sure how practical it would be. I mean, if I was wearing dark clothes during the day and couldn't make it home before dark, what would I do? I'd need to carry a spare set of night clothes with me at all times and find somewhere to change. Or perhaps carry a high-vis jacket with me. Or maybe just not cross the road. Oh goodness now I'm confused. BaldyLocks

12:48pm Mon 10 Dec 12

Mark1970 says...

Baldylocks such a cynical and immature reply to a statement of fact.

If you look at the Summer months, most people will wear bright clothing, of course people do still wear black during Summer due to fashion.

In the highway code there is advise on what you should wear as a cyclist and also a pedestrian.

I quote from the Highway Code

Help other road users to see you. Wear or carry something light-coloured, bright or fluorescent in poor daylight conditions. When it is dark, use reflective materials (e.g. armbands, sashes, waistcoats, jackets, footwear), which can be seen by drivers using headlights up to three times as far away as non-reflective materials.

So please do try and come back with a more adult response please. Road traffic safety is not just about traffic lights.
Baldylocks such a cynical and immature reply to a statement of fact. If you look at the Summer months, most people will wear bright clothing, of course people do still wear black during Summer due to fashion. In the highway code there is advise on what you should wear as a cyclist and also a pedestrian. I quote from the Highway Code Help other road users to see you. Wear or carry something light-coloured, bright or fluorescent in poor daylight conditions. When it is dark, use reflective materials (e.g. armbands, sashes, waistcoats, jackets, footwear), which can be seen by drivers using headlights up to three times as far away as non-reflective materials. So please do try and come back with a more adult response please. Road traffic safety is not just about traffic lights. Mark1970

6:51pm Mon 10 Dec 12

BaldyLocks says...

Mark1970 wrote:
Baldylocks such a cynical and immature reply to a statement of fact.

If you look at the Summer months, most people will wear bright clothing, of course people do still wear black during Summer due to fashion.

In the highway code there is advise on what you should wear as a cyclist and also a pedestrian.

I quote from the Highway Code

Help other road users to see you. Wear or carry something light-coloured, bright or fluorescent in poor daylight conditions. When it is dark, use reflective materials (e.g. armbands, sashes, waistcoats, jackets, footwear), which can be seen by drivers using headlights up to three times as far away as non-reflective materials.

So please do try and come back with a more adult response please. Road traffic safety is not just about traffic lights.
You're so right yet again. I can't believe I'm so lucky to get advise from such a wise person. Are you some sort of prophet?
I'm dashing out right now to purchase some reflective arm bands, sash, waistcoat, jacket, footwear, headband, lumi gloves, dayglo speedo.
Perhaps we could meet up and form a street patrol and we could rage at anyone wearing the wrong clothing?
Here's one 'Rwwoooororrrrr get off the street in those black trousers you idiot!!!"....do I qualify?
[quote][p][bold]Mark1970[/bold] wrote: Baldylocks such a cynical and immature reply to a statement of fact. If you look at the Summer months, most people will wear bright clothing, of course people do still wear black during Summer due to fashion. In the highway code there is advise on what you should wear as a cyclist and also a pedestrian. I quote from the Highway Code Help other road users to see you. Wear or carry something light-coloured, bright or fluorescent in poor daylight conditions. When it is dark, use reflective materials (e.g. armbands, sashes, waistcoats, jackets, footwear), which can be seen by drivers using headlights up to three times as far away as non-reflective materials. So please do try and come back with a more adult response please. Road traffic safety is not just about traffic lights.[/p][/quote]You're so right yet again. I can't believe I'm so lucky to get advise from such a wise person. Are you some sort of prophet? I'm dashing out right now to purchase some reflective arm bands, sash, waistcoat, jacket, footwear, headband, lumi gloves, dayglo speedo. Perhaps we could meet up and form a street patrol and we could rage at anyone wearing the wrong clothing? Here's one 'Rwwoooororrrrr get off the street in those black trousers you idiot!!!"....do I qualify? BaldyLocks

8:46pm Mon 10 Dec 12

Mark1970 says...

Well I did say come back without a cynical and immature response, but it looks as if you have not got past A in the dictionary.
Well I did say come back without a cynical and immature response, but it looks as if you have not got past A in the dictionary. Mark1970

8:56pm Mon 10 Dec 12

FreeSpeech? says...

Hand bags a twenty paces!
Hand bags a twenty paces! FreeSpeech?

9:00pm Mon 10 Dec 12

harryrabbit says...

LOL! Merry Christmas to little green men everywhere!
LOL! Merry Christmas to little green men everywhere! harryrabbit

2:13pm Tue 11 Dec 12

souwesterly says...

Mark1970 wrote:
Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about.

It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen.

Wear bright clothing people.
Absolutely fine with me. I'll remember to go clubbing dressed in a pretty bright orange dress, complete with flashy bits. Trouble is that I'm a bloke and I might get more than I expected if I dressed like that. And my charcoal black rig just wouldn't look right with a red light attached to the rear.
*
The onus is on everyone at night to use their lights, their eyes and their common sense. Regrettable however, at night, many pedestrians leave their brains and common sense on the dance or bar floor.......
*
H & S is fine but no-one needs to be wrapped in cotton wool. Sorry to say, but let Darwin make his own selection.
[quote][p][bold]Mark1970[/bold] wrote: Not just the traffic lights that people need to be reminded about. It is amazing how many idiots walk around at night time wearing dark clothing, this is ok if walking on the pavements, but when crossing the road they are hard to see and an accident waiting too happen. Wear bright clothing people.[/p][/quote]Absolutely fine with me. I'll remember to go clubbing dressed in a pretty bright orange dress, complete with flashy bits. Trouble is that I'm a bloke and I might get more than I expected if I dressed like that. And my charcoal black rig just wouldn't look right with a red light attached to the rear. * The onus is on everyone at night to use their lights, their eyes and their common sense. Regrettable however, at night, many pedestrians leave their brains and common sense on the dance or bar floor....... * H & S is fine but no-one needs to be wrapped in cotton wool. Sorry to say, but let Darwin make his own selection. souwesterly

9:48am Wed 12 Dec 12

CidermanInExile says...

I'm glad I'm retired. I wouldn't like to work in an office where we men had to wear yellow or orange suits to work in the winter months so that we are visible when we leave work in the dark.
I'm glad I'm retired. I wouldn't like to work in an office where we men had to wear yellow or orange suits to work in the winter months so that we are visible when we leave work in the dark. CidermanInExile

11:11am Wed 12 Dec 12

Mark1970 says...

Maybe some people are missing the point here.

What is the need for yellow or orange suits, pretty bright orange dress????

Winter clothing is a clothing designers fault, they design clothes that are the style that you would wear for a funeral.

In Switzerland, Austria etc etc where they deal with snow, they have more fashionable dress sense such as red, white, blue ski suits, which insulates heat, but also allows them to be seen more at night or incase of an accident.

Winter fashion can be trendy enough to wear with a less sombre feeling and be bright enough so that it aids motorists in seeing you more clearly.

Night time driving is hazardous as it is particularly in conditions such as rain or fog, I will give a couple of quick websites for statistics on road accidents, I could have found better if I spent more time looking, but it gives and idea.

http://rueziffra.com
/auto-accidents-occu
r-daytona-beach-law-
firm

http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
1288457/Black-cars-l
ikely-involved-accid
ents.html

So maybe you should try reading that before feeling the need to posting comments regarding hideous colours that are not needed for road safety.
Maybe some people are missing the point here. What is the need for yellow or orange suits, pretty bright orange dress???? Winter clothing is a clothing designers fault, they design clothes that are the style that you would wear for a funeral. In Switzerland, Austria etc etc where they deal with snow, they have more fashionable dress sense such as red, white, blue ski suits, which insulates heat, but also allows them to be seen more at night or incase of an accident. Winter fashion can be trendy enough to wear with a less sombre feeling and be bright enough so that it aids motorists in seeing you more clearly. Night time driving is hazardous as it is particularly in conditions such as rain or fog, I will give a couple of quick websites for statistics on road accidents, I could have found better if I spent more time looking, but it gives and idea. http://rueziffra.com /auto-accidents-occu r-daytona-beach-law- firm http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 1288457/Black-cars-l ikely-involved-accid ents.html So maybe you should try reading that before feeling the need to posting comments regarding hideous colours that are not needed for road safety. Mark1970

11:18am Wed 12 Dec 12

FreeSpeech? says...

To be absolutely honest Mark1970 does have a point. Everybody who uses the roads has a duty of care to other road users, and yes that does mean pedestrians. Please if you wish walk around in dark clothing in dimly or unlit streets but don't start bleating when you get knocked down and the same goes to the idiot cyclists with no lights. One last thought though, if you do get knocked down for a lack of duty of care you could very well find yourself being sued by the driver for his damages so be warned.
To be absolutely honest Mark1970 does have a point. Everybody who uses the roads has a duty of care to other road users, and yes that does mean pedestrians. Please if you wish walk around in dark clothing in dimly or unlit streets but don't start bleating when you get knocked down and the same goes to the idiot cyclists with no lights. One last thought though, if you do get knocked down for a lack of duty of care you could very well find yourself being sued by the driver for his damages so be warned. FreeSpeech?

11:28am Wed 12 Dec 12

souwesterly says...

On reading your links, I've immediately found out two things:
One - that drivers aged 15 to 19 are most likely to have accidents. So how many of our drivers are 15? And how many of them are American or live in Florida?
Two - do not drive a black car! Quote - "Black, grey, silver, red and blue fail to stand out against the background of the road, scenery and other traffic."
Huh - do not drive any coloured car!!
And that item comes from a study in Australia, where they don't often have the wintery weather that we have.
And the article totally implies that it's up to the car owner/driver to make his car highly visible (by using headlights at all times, for example) - not for the pedestrian to do so.
*
Please pick better examples if you want to make your point.
On reading your links, I've immediately found out two things: One - that drivers aged 15 to 19 are most likely to have accidents. So how many of our drivers are 15? And how many of them are American or live in Florida? Two - do not drive a black car! Quote - "Black, grey, silver, red and blue fail to stand out against the background of the road, scenery and other traffic." Huh - do not drive any coloured car!! And that item comes from a study in Australia, where they don't often have the wintery weather that we have. And the article totally implies that it's up to the car owner/driver to make his car highly visible (by using headlights at all times, for example) - not for the pedestrian to do so. * Please pick better examples if you want to make your point. souwesterly

5:39pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Thurza says...

I thought people came before cars, yes pedestrians should take care but so should car drivers who often drive too fast and do not seem to be aware of or think there should be anyone else on the road except themselves.
I thought people came before cars, yes pedestrians should take care but so should car drivers who often drive too fast and do not seem to be aware of or think there should be anyone else on the road except themselves. Thurza

6:06pm Wed 12 Dec 12

FreeSpeech? says...

Thurza wrote:
I thought people came before cars, yes pedestrians should take care but so should car drivers who often drive too fast and do not seem to be aware of or think there should be anyone else on the road except themselves.
As I thought I had quite clearly stated before everyone who uses the road owes a duty of care to each other.
Plenty of pedestrians and cyclists out that think the world should stop for them so perhaps car drivers should keep their headlights off at night so we can all be imbeciles together.
[quote][p][bold]Thurza[/bold] wrote: I thought people came before cars, yes pedestrians should take care but so should car drivers who often drive too fast and do not seem to be aware of or think there should be anyone else on the road except themselves.[/p][/quote]As I thought I had quite clearly stated before everyone who uses the road owes a duty of care to each other. Plenty of pedestrians and cyclists out that think the world should stop for them so perhaps car drivers should keep their headlights off at night so we can all be imbeciles together. FreeSpeech?

7:34pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Mark1970 says...

souwesterly wrote:
On reading your links, I've immediately found out two things:
One - that drivers aged 15 to 19 are most likely to have accidents. So how many of our drivers are 15? And how many of them are American or live in Florida?
Two - do not drive a black car! Quote - "Black, grey, silver, red and blue fail to stand out against the background of the road, scenery and other traffic."
Huh - do not drive any coloured car!!
And that item comes from a study in Australia, where they don't often have the wintery weather that we have.
And the article totally implies that it's up to the car owner/driver to make his car highly visible (by using headlights at all times, for example) - not for the pedestrian to do so.
*
Please pick better examples if you want to make your point.
If you actually read and digested what I had said.

I could have found better if I spent more time looking, but it gives and idea.

I had already said that this was just a very quick google search so it was just a taster of statistics, if you wished then you could go deeper into it, but for most of the moronic comments that have appeared, then intelligent reading is not warranted.
[quote][p][bold]souwesterly[/bold] wrote: On reading your links, I've immediately found out two things: One - that drivers aged 15 to 19 are most likely to have accidents. So how many of our drivers are 15? And how many of them are American or live in Florida? Two - do not drive a black car! Quote - "Black, grey, silver, red and blue fail to stand out against the background of the road, scenery and other traffic." Huh - do not drive any coloured car!! And that item comes from a study in Australia, where they don't often have the wintery weather that we have. And the article totally implies that it's up to the car owner/driver to make his car highly visible (by using headlights at all times, for example) - not for the pedestrian to do so. * Please pick better examples if you want to make your point.[/p][/quote]If you actually read and digested what I had said. I could have found better if I spent more time looking, but it gives and idea. I had already said that this was just a very quick google search so it was just a taster of statistics, if you wished then you could go deeper into it, but for most of the moronic comments that have appeared, then intelligent reading is not warranted. Mark1970

10:19pm Wed 12 Dec 12

souwesterly says...

Absolutely agree Mark1970, but in the interest of not submitting rubbish then surely it would be sensible to provide apt and localised links regardless of how long it took to find them.
Please don't pontificate, or otherwise act in a superior manner on such matters when your own information is so sketchy.
Absolutely agree Mark1970, but in the interest of not submitting rubbish then surely it would be sensible to provide apt and localised links regardless of how long it took to find them. Please don't pontificate, or otherwise act in a superior manner on such matters when your own information is so sketchy. souwesterly

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