US president Donald Trump has thrust America and Cuba back on a path towards open hostility with a blistering denunciation of the island’s communist government.

He clamped down on some commerce and travel, but left intact many new avenues his predecessor Barack Obama had opened.

The Cuban government responded by rejecting what it called Mr Trump’s “hostile rhetoric”, but said it was willing to continue “respectful dialogue” on topics of mutual interest.

Even as Mr Trump predicted a quick end to President Raul Castro’s regime, he challenged Cuba to negotiate better agreements for Americans, Cubans and those whose identities lie somewhere in between.

Diplomatic relations, restored only two years ago, will remain intact, but in a shift from Mr Obama’s approach, Mr Trump said trade and other penalties would stay in place until a long list of prerequisites was met.

“America has rejected the Cuban people’s oppressors,” Mr Trump said in Miami’s Little Havana, the cradle of Cuban-American resistance to Mr Castro’s government. Officially, today, they are rejected.”

Declaring Mr Obama’s pact with Mr Castro a “completely one-sided deal”, Mr Trump said he was cancelling it.

In practice, however, many recent changes to boost ties to Cuba will stay as they are.

Mr Trump cast that as a sign the US still wanted to engage with Cuba in hopes of forging “a much stronger and better path”.

In a statement on government-run websites and television, President Castro’s administration said Mr Trump’s speech was “loaded with hostile rhetoric that recalls the times of open confrontation”.

The lengthy statement then went on to strike a conciliatory tone, saying Cuba wants to continue negotiations with the US on a variety of subjects.

“The last two years have shown that the two countries can cooperate and co-exist in a civilised way,” it said.

Embassies in Havana and Washington will remain open and US airlines and cruise ships will still be allowed to serve the island 90 miles south of Florida.